At Bitrefill, Innovators Build a Circular Economy for Bitcoin

This is a sponsored article provided by Bitrefill. Creating an e-commerce ramp for Bitcoin users, Bitrefill has set itself apart with a mission to revolutionize the way that bitcoin can function as a true everyday currency worldwide. Established in 2015, Bitrefill is the world’s largest crypto-only e-commerce site. To explain some of the philosophy that went behind the development of this company, as well as some of the places that it looks to expand in the future, we spoke with the project’s Chief Communications Officer John Carvalho. “Bitrefill has existed…

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Why FOSS Development Is Crucial for Bitcoin’s Mainstream Acceptance

Crypto likes to see itself as disruptive, just as Apple disrupted mobile phones (and the camera), Tesla disrupted automotive (and also sustainable energy), Twitter/Facebook/WhatsApp disrupted media and communications (and also digital community building). At OKCoin, we embrace this industry because we also believe that bitcoin and subsequent cryptocurrencies represent a paradigm shift in both our financial system and social fabric. While it’s unclear what this shift will look like, or if it will ever be static, there will always be a need for a technical and financial infrastructure that allows…

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How Bitcoin Optech Is Connecting the Open-Source and Corporate Worlds

Bitcoin Core and other open-source projects have, over the years, built a range of technologies to improve Bitcoin scaling and the general Bitcoin user experience. With examples including Segregated Witness (SegWit), Replace-By-Fee and the Lightning Network, Bitcoin users have a number of tools at their disposal to utilize the Bitcoin blockchain as best and efficiently as possible. Yet, bigger companies in particular have historically been slow to adopt such tools. Segregated Witness is a prime example: Several of the largest Bitcoin businesses hadn’t adopted the upgrade for over a year…

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Microsoft’s ION Is an Open-Source Bet on Bitcoin

Open-source development has always enjoyed a little juice from the private sector. One of the most notable examples is Red Hat Software, a multibillion dollar corporation that has built open-source software for the international community. It was purchased by IBM in 2019 but still carries out its original function. Microsoft is another example of a highly profitable private company that releases open-source software. The computer monolith has helped to maintain the Linux source code for some time. It supported the software on its Azure cloud program and eventually integrated the…

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For Square Crypto, the Way to Bitcoin Mass Adoption Is Open Source

When Jack Dorsey founded Square in February 2009, Bitcoin was all of one month old. In fact, Satoshi Nakamoto and Dorsey were likely laying the groundwork for their respective creations concurrently in the year prior. Ten years later, the two would converge in what now seems like an inevitable collision.  Square launched its Venmo-like payment service, Cash App, in 2013. The application features common stock investing, and in June 2019, it added bitcoin to the mix of assets you can purchase on the app. But a few months before this,…

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Infographic: Who Has Funded Bitcoin Core Development?

Monetarily, free and open-source software (FOSS) has always been at a disadvantage to proprietary software. It’s easier to solicit funding for a centralized project than for a decentralized one, not least of all because companies necessitate business models. Conversely, funding (and the agendas that often come with it) seems almost anathema to FOSS projects. At the very least, it is elusive. And Bitcoin is no exception. When creating Bitcoin, Satoshi asked for no compensation of any kind (it was, after all, still an open-source project). Satoshi also never tapped the…

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AI-Managed Bitcoin Trading Accounts Show Significant ROI

This is a sponsored article provided by World Markets. Looking for the next best thing to invest in is difficult — sometimes you get in too late and miss the opportunity of a lifetime. Trading in the cryptocurrency market can be extremely profitable if done correctly, but it requires a deep understanding of the market you’re in. One of the most exciting and yet difficult things that the crypto market has to offer is its volatility. This same factor has made people millionaires but has also cost others a fortune.…

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Infographic: The Pineapple Fund’s Unparalleled Impact

Bitcoiners have a giving streak. It’s true. No matter what narrative the mainstream media may hammer home about drugs, greed or wanton hedonism, Bitcoin’s community has a long-standing tradition of charitable action. Perhaps the earliest example of this is the Bitcoin100 charity drive. Bootstrapped in 2011 on the Bitcointalk forum, the organization raised at least 1,600 bitcoin before it went inactive. It originally intended to dole these donations out in lumps of 100 bitcoin, but as bitcoin’s price bucked upward from 2011 to 2013, the organizers decided to make donations…

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2020 Bitcoin Adoption: Why Nonprofits Will Lead the Way

Microsoft accepts bitcoin. Nobody cares. Why? Because if you want people to give up their bitcoin, you’d better have a damn good reason. Microsoft and other companies that accept BTC don’t currently have that. When you currently spend BTC on something from Microsoft, you aren’t getting any additional financial benefit of using that payment method versus a credit card, especially in the U.S. where using BTC for purchases is a tax nightmare. The typical case for spending BTC versus fiat is usually about adoption to encourage more merchants to accept…

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Bitcoin100: How Some Early Bitcoiners Spread Bitcoin Adoption With Charity

On November 22, 2011, a post appeared on bitcointalk.org with the following proposition: What followed was a five-year experiment in community fundraising, with the goal of educating charities about the benefits of accepting bitcoin as donation payments.  The brainchild of Phinnaeus Gage, Bitcoin100’s original concept was fairly simple: Get 100 supporters to pledge (at least) 1 BTC to the pot. Then convince a deserving charitable organization to accept the 100 BTC donation — under one condition. The charity would have to be willing accept the funds in bitcoin and to…

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